Sin = Self Worship

Sin = Self Worship

  • By: Scott Stein
  • Sep 20, 2022

Have you ever read the story of Adam and Eve eating from the forbidden tree and wondered to yourself, “What was the big deal? Why did God get so upset over one little mistake?”

While such a question might seem reasonable, what it reveals is our failure to grasp the true nature of sin and its consequences.

In this video, Scott follows the logic of the Apostle Paul’s explanation of the nature of our sin, its offense against God, and the ultimate impact our sin has on us.

In Romans 1:25 Paul writes: “They exchanged the truth about God for a lie, and worshipped and served created things rather than the Creator – who is forever praised. Amen.”

The key to understanding Paul’s explanation is the word “exchanged”. He uses this word three times to explain the logical outworking of sin, and the far-reaching impact it makes. He shows that our sin isn’t just the little mistakes we make because “we’re only human after all”. Rather, sin is our willful decision to replace God with something else as the object of our worship. And since God is the creator of everything else, anything we replace God with is necessarily part of his creation. In short, we’ve become a creation that practices self-worship.

Admittedly, this short video about sin and self-worship presents us with some pretty bad news. But remember, Jesus is the “good news”. If you want more than just the bad news, check out our “See the World as Jesus Sees It” series where you can watch the full version of these videos.

 

Still wondering more about God’s purpose for the world, and for you?

Seeing the World as Jesus Sees It is a four-part video series that walks you through the Grand Story of the Bible, challenges your worldview, and gives you answers to ultimate questions about God.

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